Symposia

Symposia Schedule

Symposium 1:
Membrane-based electrodes: from traditional potentiometry to dynamic electrochemistry
(details)

Symposium 2:
Nanomaterials in electroanalysis and nanoelectrochemical sensorss (details)

Symposium 3:
Electrochemical conversion of CO2: Sensing, monitoring, mechanism and technological development (details)

Symposium 4:
New Trends in Bioelectrochemistry (details)

Symposium 5:
Coupling electrochemical and optical methods to study chemo- and bioobjects: light as sensor and actuator (details)

Symposium 6:
Advances in Microbial Electrochemistry for Energy Conversion, Biotransformation, Bioremediation and Electroanalysis (details)

Symposium 7:
Electrochemical capacitors: beyond double-layer storage (details)

Symposium 8:
Next Generation Batteries – S&T Challenges and Opportunities (details)

Symposium 9:
Fuel Cells and Electrolysis: Promising energy for the futures (details)

Symposium 10:
Electrochemical and electroless deposition: tailoring growth from monolayers and nanostructures to functional applications (details)

Symposium 11:
Corrosion and corrosion protection strategies (details)

Symposium 12:
Electrochemical Engineering for Environmentally Friendly Processing and Environmental Protection (details)

Symposium 13:
Electrochemistry in the digital age: model-supported process analysis and designs (details)

Symposium 14:
Future of molecular electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 15:
When Molecular Electrochemistry Meets Luminescence: from Fundamentals to Analytical Applications (details)

Symposium 16:
Two-Dimensional Materials: An Electrochemical Perspective (details)

Symposium 17:
Electroactive materials: polymers, inorganic solids, nanocomposites and hybrid materials (details)

Symposium 18:
Nanoelectrochemistry and electrocatalysis – from fundamentals to applications (details)

Symposium 19:
Electrochemical surface and interface (details)

Symposium 20:
Cutting Edge Electrochemical Measurement Techniques (details)

Symposium 21:
Education and transmission of knowledge from the past to the new generations of electrochemists (details)

Symposium 22:
General Session (details)


Symposium 1
Membrane-based electrodes: from traditional potentiometry to dynamic electrochemistry

Sponsored by :
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Membranes are used in many different applications in which electrochemistry techniques act as the analytical signal readout or to fully tune ion transfer processes across the membrane. This symposium aims to bring together current studies involving membrane-based electrodes and also the use of ion exchange membranes for miscellaneous purposes.
Thus, the scope of this symposium include (among others):
• Ion selective electrodes: fundaments and analytical applications
• Novel concepts involving ion exchange membranes
• Tuned ion transfer processes (in terms of selective receptors and the readout)
• Theoretical modelling of the working mechanism of membrane-based electrodes
• The exploration of new materials in membrane-based electrodes
• Water remediation processes
• Proton exchange membranes fuel cells and electrolyzers
• Healthcare and other applications
• Nanopore electrochemistry
• Biomembrane electrochemistry
• Electroanalysis based on microdialysis

Symposium Organizers
Maria Cuartero Botia (Coordinator), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden (mariacb@kth.se)
Gaston Crespo, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
Maria Assunta Navarra, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
Guobao Xu, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
Valentin Mirčeski, Ss. Cyril and Methodious University, North Macedonia

Back to top


Symposium 2
Nanomaterials in electroanalysis and nanoelectrochemical sensors

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

This Symposium would like to be a focus on recent advances in the use of nanomaterials in electroanalytical chemistry, to understand if the game (i.e. the effort and commitment for their preparation) is worth the candle (i.e. their unique properties yielding unforeseen interesting analytical performances).
The manufacturing effort includes not only the synthetic and functionalization work, but also the increasing use of electrochemical simulation to enhance nanoelectrochemical sensor device design and architecture de nition prior to fabrication, which enable more autonomous systems for sensing applications in different elds, such as health, environment protection and agriculture.
Moreover, recent advances on lab-on-a-chip devices, single-use sensors, paper-based electrodes, wearable or smartphone-based electrochemical systems and multiplexed or orthogonal analysis with integrated spectroscopic analysis, will be developed.
Finally, the use of electroanalytical techniques for investigating the properties of nano-objects will be considered, particularly focusing on the impact of these materials on human health and environmental safety.

Symposium Organizers
Luigi Falciola (Coordinator), Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy (luigi.falciola@unimi.it)
Alain Walcarius, Université de Lorraine, France
James Rohan, University College Cork, Ireland
Sotirios Sotiropoulos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Biljana Šljukić, University of Belgrade, Serbia Aleksandar Radu, Keele University, UK

Back to top


Symposium 3
Electrochemical conversion of CO2: Sensing, monitoring, mechanism and technological development

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

This symposium aims to embrace all relevant (fundamental and technological) aspects of CO2 capture and conversion to value-added chemicals. This symposium is co-organized by three of the ISE Divisions (1, 4 and 5) and is devoted to explore all different approaches provided by the electrochemistry in order to detect, monitor and mitigate the CO2 accumulation, with the possibility to synthesize valuable products.

Contributions are welcome in, but not limited to, the following areas:
• Sensing of airborne CO2, monitoring during its transformation upon application of any electrochemical technology.
• CO2 conversion by homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts in different solvent media, including ionic liquids.
• Mechanism studies, including reaction products and intermediates detection and quanti cation by
spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques.
• Sustainable advanced electrodes including metals, alloys, semiconductors, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), carbon-based and electrochemically synthesized materials.
• Reactor design for CO2 electrolysis systems
• Technological application of CO2 conversion processes and economic analysis

Symposium Organizers
Carlos M. Sánchez-Sánchez (Coordinator), Sorbonne Université, France (carlos.sanchez@upmc.fr)
Tom Breugelmans, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Ignacio Sirés Sadornil, University of Barcelona, Spain
Nejc Hodnik, National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenia

Back to top


Symposium 4
New Trends in Bioelectrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

The main symposium of division 2 will cover all aspects of bioelectrochemistry from basic investigations to different elds of application including photobioelectrochemistry. Studies of different biomolecules, biomimetica, cell compartments and whole cells will be described. New materials and material combinations will be covered as well as new developments in methodology and hyphenated techniques.

Topics, the symposium is focused on:
• Fundamental elucidation of electron / proton transfer pathways in biological systems
• Heterogeneous electron transfer at bioelectrodes
• Novel electrodes, materials and electrode arrays for biological systems
• Novel experimental and theoretical tools in bioelectrochemistry
• microelectrochemistry and study of biological systems
• Sensing of small molecules or biomolecules by means of biological recognition elements or modified electrodes including point-of-use sensing
• Energy conversion / storage including biofuel cells, photobioelectrodes, biobatteries, biocapacitors
• Electrosynthesis with biocatalyzed reactions and cas- cades and electrobiotechnology

Symposium Organizers
Fred Lisdat (Coordinator), Technical University Wildau, Germany (flisdat@th-wildau.de)
Nicolas Plumeré, Ruhr University Bochum, Germany
Julea Butt, University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK
Victor Constantin Diculescu, National Institute of Materials Physics, Romania

Back to top


Symposium 5
Coupling electrochemical and optical methods to study chemo- and bioobjects: light as sensor and actuator

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

In a sustainable economy, bio-objects and chemically modi ed interfaces attract increasing interest for applications including energetics, synthesis and sensing. This symposium will focus on coupling spectroscopic methods with electrochemical potential control for the study of bio-objects, biomimetic systems and electrochemical reactions covering the size range from macroscopic to the single-molecule level. With the focus on methods, the symposium will also include functional systems intended to be used for triggering reactions or sensing applications. Further, it will comprise fundamental studies on the in uence of light on (bio)chemical reactions. This highly interdisciplinary topic aims at bringing together experts in bioelectrochemistry, electroanalysis, in situ microscopies (SECM, STM, AFM, light microscopy) and spectroscopic methods, as well as signal processing, technique development and image processing.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:
• rationalisation of behaviour at bioelectrodes
• light–matter interactions at (bio)electrochemical interfaces
• spectroelectrochemistry
• electrochemiluminescence
• plasmonic effects on mechanisms and reaction rate
• new developments in sensor technologies
• integration of bio- and bioinspired objects with semiconductor structures
• single-molecule switching and dynamics.

Symposium Organizers
Elisabeth Lojou (Coordinator), CNRS, Aix Marseille University, France (lojou@imm.cnrs.fr)
Kylie Vincent, Oxford University, UK
Stijn Mertens, Lancaster University, UK
Priscilla G L Baker, University of the Western Cape, South Africa

Back to top


Symposium 6
Advances in Microbial Electrochemistry for Energy Conversion, Biotransformation, Bioremediation and Electroanalysis

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

This symposium covers key recent advances in electrochemical microbial research, from basic studies of microbial electrochemical systems to electrochemical technological applications including energy production, co-generation of chemicals and electricity and bioelectrosynthesis, recovery of environmental resources, wastewater treatment, food and agricultural analysis, and environmental monitoring. Electrochemical engineering contributing to improved bioelectrochemical cell/reactor designs and process control as applied to microbial electrochemical technology are also covered.

Topics the symposium focus on are:
• Fundamental studies of mechanisms of bacterial extracellular electron transfer reactions
• Bioengineering of bacteria to improve extracellular electron transfer
• New experimental and modeling strategies to address electrochemical processes in microbial electrochemical systems
• Environmental, food and agricultural electroanalysis with microbial systems
• Electrochemical detection of bacteria and bio lms
• Microbial energy conversion, production and storage devices, including microbial fuel cells, biosupercapacitors and batteries
• Microbial electrosynthesis and electrotransformation
• New electrodes materials and designs for microbial electrochemical systems

Symposium Organizers
Elena Ferapontova, (Coordinator), Aarhus University, Denmark
Lo Gorton, Lund University, Sweden
Carlo Santoro, University of the West of England, UK
Mathieu Etienne, Université de Lorraine, France
Eileen Hao Yu, Newcastle University, UK
Tanja Vidakovic-Koch, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Germany

Back to top


Symposium 7
Electrochemical capacitors: beyond double-layer storage

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The symposium will cover several aspects of electrochemical capacitors development, starting from fundamental aspects concerning the double-layer storage, pseudocapacitive effects and redox-related phenomena at electrode/electrolyte interface in protic and aprotic media. In this term, reports on novel concepts and novel chemistries for high-power and high-energy systems, falling into the scope of capacitive storage, are of symposium interest. The broad scope of this symposium welcomes contributions reporting on the materials, electrolytes and separators in electrochemical capacitors application. Apart from typical electrochemical reports, results on the electrolyte formulation, electrode fabrication and modeling studies are welcome. Since the long-term performance is one of the crucial aspects in electrochemical capacitors development, contributions providing insights into ageing aspects are also expected. Special attention will be focused on the rapidly growing subject of operando techniques in electrochemical capacitors characterization, providing new insights for understanding of capacitive and faradaic charge storage mechanisms.

Symposium Organizers
Sonia Dsoke (Coordinator), Helmholtz Institute Ulm & Institute for Applied Materials – Energy Storage Systems, Germany (sonia.dsoke@kit.edu)
Krzysztof Fic, Poznan University of Technology, Poland
Wataru Sugimoto, Shinshu University, Japan
Zoran Mandić, University of Zagreb, Croatia Branimir Grgur, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Back to top


Symposium 8
Next Generation Batteries – S&T Challenges and Opportunities

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

Almost 30 years after the commercialization of the rst Li-ion battery, the number of applications has rapidly increased and it appears that this technology is presently the only one simultaneously ensuring performance, cost, and safety demands. However, these needs are stead- ily increasing, which requires continuous advancements towards the existing and the development of new cell components and processing techniques – ideally based on the fundamental understanding of, e.g., the reactions occurring in the bulk and at the interface of the active material particles. These efforts include also the replace- ment of potentially critical elements, such as cobalt or lithium itself.
Accordingly, this symposium is devoted to recent advances in elucidating fundamental electrochemical mechanisms and reactions occurring in Li-ion and post- Li-ion battery chemistries as well as the development of optimized and new cell components. Studies, which are related to other (applied) aspects of batteries, including also innovative characterization techniques, are welcome as well.

Symposium Organizers
Dominic Bresser (Coordinator), Helmholtz Institute Ulm and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany (dominic.bresser@kit.edu)
Robert Kostecki, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA
Miran Gaberšček, National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenia
Milica Vujković, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Back to top


Symposium 9
Fuel Cells and Electrolysis: Promising energy for the future

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium covers fundamental and applied studies in the design of novel electrochemical interfaces that improve the ef ciency of fuel production in electrolyzers and their utilization in fuel cells.

Specific topics as follows:
• New functional materials and cell components (e.g., electrocatalysts, ionomers, electrolyte membranes/ separators, gas diffusion layers, bipolar plates, etc.) for both low- and high-temperature applications.
• Novel electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction, electro- oxidation of hydrogen and organic fuels, oxygen and hydrogen evolution.
• Electrolyte membrane/separators and ionomers for fuel cells, water electrolysis systems, and H2O-CO2 co-electrolysis: synthesis and characterization of polymeric, ceramic, ionic liquid and nanocomposite systems.
• Improved understanding of electrochemical processes and new insights into the degradation of fuel cell and electrolyzer components in low- and high-temperature applications.
• Operando diagnostics and in situ characterization of fuel cells, water electrolysis systems, and H2O-CO2 co-electrolysis.
• Theoretical studies and computational modeling of functional materials and cell components.
• Novel materials for anion exchange membrane fuel cells, electrolyzers and H2O-CO2 co-electrolysis systems.
• Development of precious metal free catalysts and anion conductive membranes and ionomers. Understanding electrochemical reactions occurring under alkaline conditions

Symposium Organizers
Nenad Marković (Coordinator), Argonne National Lab, USA (nmmarkovic@anl.gov)
Vojislav Stamenković, Argonne National Lab, USA
Hamish Andrew Miller, CNR-ICCOM, Italy
Milica Marčeta Kaninski, University of Belgrade, Serbia
Frano Barbir, University of Split, Croatia

Back to top


Symposium 10
Electrochemical and electroless deposition: tailoring growth from monolayers and nanostructures to functional applications

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Various processes of electrochemical material growth are now available, capable to control composition, morphology, structure and thickness of a range of materials, from the monoatomic layer to the mm range. Surface methods utilize underpotential procedures, which could be utterly precise but are generally slow; in contrast, overpotential methods are faster but not as precise. This symposium aims to involve the “UPD community” and the “electroplaters” in a forum focused on bridging the gap between these two classes of materials. Contributions in the general are- as of UPD, few atomic layers materials and thick lms are welcome; however, we aim to concentrate the discussion on the gray area between the two, where novel concepts may be needed to enhance the quality of materials. In particular, contributions are welcome, but not limited to:
• Concepts and methods of few monolayer growth
• Two-dimensional materials
• Tailoring micro/nanostructure over length scales via voltage waveforms and/or additives
• Electrochemical synthesis in ionic liquid, novel media
• The origin of growth instability and methods to avoid them
• Electrodeposited alloys, compounds, oxide and chal-cogenides
• Functional materials enabled by growth control

Symposium Organizers
Giovanni Zangari (Coordinator), University of Virginia, USA (gz3e@virginia.edu)
Fu-Ming Wang, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Korea
Piotr Zabinski, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Nebojša Nikolić, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Back to top


Symposium 11
Corrosion and corrosion protection strategies

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

This symposium includes all aspects of corrosion science and technology with a special focus on growth and characterization of passive lms, anodic oxides and smart coatings for corrosion protection of metallic materials. It will cover both theoretical analysis and experimental investigations, including the modelling of the interface and the description of new techniques for the study of corrosion and coatings degradation.

Topics include but are not limited to:
• Corrosion Mechanisms, Methods, Modelling and Monitoring
• Passive Films: formation, chemistry, structure and properties
• Growth and characterization of chemically and electrochemically formed protective coatings
• Tribocorrosion: fundamentals, materials and prevention
• Electrodeposition for Corrosion and Wear Protection
• In situ and ex situ characterization of surfaces and relationship between their structure and corrosion
resistance
• Advanced electrochemical and analytical tools for assessing corrosion resistance and passive lms.
• Passivity and corrosion of Steel in Concrete
• Corrosion studies for safeguard of Archaeological and Historical Artefacts
• Corrosion and corrosion protection of Biomaterials

Symposium Organizers
Vincent Vivier (Coordinator), Sorbonne University – Paris, France (vincent.vivier@sorbonne-universite.fr)
Michele Curioni, University of Manchester, UK
Emma Angelini, Politecnico di Torino, Italy
Monica Santamaria, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy
Liana Muresan, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Ingrid Milošev, Institut Jožef Stefan, Slovenia

Back to top


Symposium 12
Electrochemical Engineering for Environmentally Friendly Processing and Environmental Protection

Sponsored by:
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Electrochemical engineering provides a platform for the introduction of green chemistry and sustainable process- es for the chemical and biological industry. Sustainability of resources such as reduction in air emissions, energy consumption, and water consumption are key for sustain- able manufacturing of chemicals and materials. Besides preventing new emissions to the environment, electrochemical technologies are also effective in existing pollutions abatement. This symposium will provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of the most recent developments on the application of electrolysis and electrochemical processes in traditional chemical processes that had enabled and/or could lead to sustainable manufacturing and green chemistry.
Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
• New electrochemical technologies for water process- ing (treatment, reuse), materials synthesis and/or recycling.
• Electrokinetic soil remediation.
• Electrochemicaltechnologiesforairemissioncontroland carbon dioxide utilization.
• Advanced sustainable electrode materials and structures.
• Life-cycle analysis demonstrating the impact of electrochemistry in sustainable manufacturing and/or green chemistry.
• Advancedcellandsystemdesign,including reactant and product flow, heat transfer, and stack level materials corrosion.
• Electrochemicalperformanceandcellcharacterization.
• Development and optimization of the energy conversion and storage processes.
• Applications and economic analysis.
• Scale up demonstration of novel electrochemical processes.

Symposium Organizers
Gerardine Botte (Coordinator), Ohio University, USA (botte@ohio.edu)
Manuel Rodrigo, University de Castilla La Mancha, Spain
Vladimir Panić, University of Belgrade
Gyozo Lang, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

Back to top


Symposium 13
Electrochemistry in the digital age: model-supported process analysis and design

Sponsored by:
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engi- neering and Technology
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

The 21st century is becoming a century of digitalization, where phenomena at surfaces up to industrial processes are analyzed via mathematical modeling, and where technologies are designed, optimized, and monitored with virtual tools. Electrochemical technologies entail intricate interactions and correlations at material to system level. In this realm, modeling provides crucial insights and tools to precipitate advances in materials properties and cell performance and interpret electrochemical measurement data. Also, the route from the discovery of electrochemical principles to highly performing systems and devices requires multiple informed choices, where model-assisted analyses and design play a role.
This symposium aims at discussing these aspects and surveying the recent progress in established or emerging modeling methods and approaches, ranging from computational chemistry and continuum or mean eld models to hybrid and data driven methods. It will provide a forum for vibrant scienti c exchange among electrochemical engineering, physical electrochemistry and various elds of application, such as in energy and sensor technologies.

Symposium Organizers
Ulrike Krewer (Coordinator), TU Braunschweig, Germany (u.krewer@tu-braunschweig.de)
Michael Eikerling, Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada
Adam Weber, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, USA
Igor Pašti, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Back to top


Symposium 14
Future of molecular electrochemistry

Sponsored by:
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

In recent years, there has been a tremendous resurgence in the eld of electrochemical transformations at the molecular level, promoted inter alia, by the development and exploitment of new electrode materials, media, cell con gurations and/or of new electrosynthetic strategies, affording new products or improved performances in terms e.g. of improved yield and/or selectivity, lower costs, simpler synthetic pathways and/ or better ecocompatibility; by the increasing need of understanding and rationalizing the electron transfer mechanisms involving complex electroactive organic, organometallic or coordination molecules or related materials to master and optimize their application in e.g. molecular electroanalysis, molecular electrocatalysis, molecular material science, molecular optoelectronics/ non-linear optics/chiroptics/spintronics, molecular (bio) energetics, molecular media (ionic liquid/liquid crystals/ DES...), as well as biology, pharmaceutics, and medicine. The Symposium devoted to the present and future of molecular electrochemistry will therefore cover a broad range of topics including, but not limited to
• fundamental investigations on the mechanisms of action or transformation of the above molecules or
molecule materials, on their reactivity initiated by electron transfer and on the relationship between structure and redox properties.
• new tools, protocols and/or strategies for bond activation by ET for (electro)synthetic purposes
• investigation, also by application of combined techniques and combining experimental data with theoretical computantions, of the electronic features of complex molecules and molecular systems, dealing e.g. with issues like intramolecular electronic communication, multiple interacting redox centres, host-guest interactions, electrochromism, redox properties affected by conformation change, stereoelectrochemistry, enantioselectivity at electrochemical interphases, toelectrochemistry, etc.

Symposium Organizers
Patrizia Romana Mussini (Coordinator), Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy (patrizia.mussini@unimi.it)
Marília Oliveira Fonseca Goulart, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil
Jiří Ludvík, J. Heyrovský Institute, Czech Republic

Back to top


Symposium 15
When Molecular Electrochemistry Meets Luminescence: from Fundamentals to Analytical Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

In recent years, the combination of molecular electrochemistry and luminescence has begun to show signi cant potential for the development of new superior analytical strategies. Accordingly, this symposium will address fundamental aspects, recent developments and (bio)analytical applications of redox molecules (organic, organometallic, coordination compounds) possessing luminescent properties. This symposium will cover a broad range of topics including, but not limited to: electro uorochromism, electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL), new molecular luminophores, mechanistic investigations, the development of new enabling instrumentation for coupling of electrochemistry and luminescence, simulation and theoretical aspects of related phenomena, sensors and biosensors based on electrochemistry and luminescence. The purpose of this symposium is thus to bring together the leading scientists working in all these aspects, in order to stimulate intensive discussion and initiate/improve collaborations.

Symposium Organizers
Olivier Buriez (Coordinator), Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris, France (olivier.buriez@ens.fr)
Guobao Xu, Chinese Academy of Science, China
Conor Hogan, La Trobe University, Australia
Neso Sojic, Université de Bordeaux, France
Rastko Vasilić, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Back to top


Symposium 16
Two-Dimensional Materials: An Electrochemical Perspective

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Two-dimensional (2D) materials possess a range of unique properties that represent the ultimate limit for a range of known phenomena and existing applications, and present opportunities for new disruptive technologies. Realisation of these opportunities requires a fundamental-level understanding of the electrochemical fabrication, responses, performance and applications of these materials. This symposium seeks to deliver these and to point the way forward to intellectual insights of importance for both the scienti c and industrial communities. The symposium will cover recent advances in physical and interfacial aspects of 2D material electrochemistry, including:
• Electrochemical charge transfers at 2D material interfaces
• Electrochemicalin-situprobesat2Dmaterialinterfaces
• Transport through 2D materials
• Reactionincon nedenvironmentswithin2Dmaterials
• 2D heterostructural and (electro)chemical properties
• Engineering 2D materials for electrochemical applications
• Novel 2D crystal-based electrochemical devices

Symposium Organizers
Robert Hillman (Coordinator), University of Leicester, UK (arh7@le.ac.uk)
Shen Ye, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan
Nakkiran Arulmozhi, Leiden University, The Netherland
Csaba Janaky, University of Szeged, Hungary

Back to top


Symposium 17
Electroactive materials: polymers, inorganic solids, nanocomposites and hybrid materials

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The symposium is designed to cover an extensive area of various electroactive materials and composites of electrochemical interest, including conducting/ conjugated/redox polymers, mixed electron-ion inorganic conductors, mixed-valence inorganic solids, lithium-ion intercalation materials, various electroactive composite materials, etc. Both their synthesis and applications will be among topics of this symposium. Special accent will be made on original concepts for the generation of electroactive materials, on systems possessing unusual properties, on their advanced applications in molecular electrochemistry, electroanalysis, (electro)catalysis, (bio) sensors, actuators, drug delivery, energy storage and electrochromic devices, solar energy conversion, micro- and nanoelectronics, radical scavenging, corrosion protection, etc., as well as on the relationships between their structure, properties and performance in applications.

Symposium Organizers
Marijana Kraljić Roković (Coordinator), Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Zagreb, Croatia (mkralj@fkit.hr)
Mikhail A. Vorotyntsev, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia and University of Burgundy and Franche-Compte, Dijon, France
Jürgen Heinze, University of Freiburg, Institute for Physical Chemistry, Freiburg, Germany
Gordana Ćirić-Marjanović, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Back to top


Symposium 18
Nanoelectrochemistry and electrocatalysis – from fundamentals to applications

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Reactions at complex real systems in sensing, energy conversion and others are characterized by signi cant heterogeneity. Their properties cannot be resolved accurately when averaging techniques are applied. One way to circumvent this problem is to model the real system by idealized systems, as is e.g. done when single crystal surfaces are used, which also can by methods developed in surface science, like STM. The other option is the utilization of nanoelectrodes or nanoarchitectures enabling electrochemical analysis across different scales in both size and concentration, even down to nanometer scales and the single entity level. The same methods can be applied to study living systems, which are inherently heterogeneous and elucidate this diversity down to the level of individual cells. To even further characterize and understand these complex systems it is often required to apply orthogonal analytical methods, including scanning electrochemical, super resolution and electron microscopy. The symposium covers the entire spectrum of electrocatalytic reactions, nanosensors, nanoelectrode fabrication, spatially resolved measurements and theoretical work. The organizers wish to bring together researchers working on fundamental model systems for fuel cells, electrolyzers, metal-air batteries and arti cial photosynthesis including nanoelectrochemical techniques for sensing, electrocatalysis, materials science, and biology and theoretical description thereof.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, fundamental research on:
• Electrocatalysis of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, chloride, as well as oxidation and hydrogenation of small organic molecules
• Electrocatalytic reactions in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes, ionic liquids and water in salt.
• Electrocatalyst materials such as metals, oxides, nitrides, phosphides, chalcogenides comprising nanoparticles, nanostructures or single crystals
• Bio-inspired electrocatalysts with relevance to arti cial photosynthesis
• Mechanistic studies, property-activity relationships, property-selectivity relationships and property-stability relationships
• Combined electrocatalytic and spectroscopic studies
• Theoretical work on all time and length scales
• Sensor design and simulation to enhance sensitivity, improve selectivity and/or gain greater stability
• Novel device fabrication methodologies and materials for sensing applications
• Electrochemical surface imaging techniques and combinations with other methods
• Investigation of biological objects down to single entities

Symposium Organizers
Marcel Risch (Coordinator), Helmholtz Center for Materials and Energy, Germany (marcel.risch@helmholtz-berlin.de)
Paolo Actis, University of Leeds, UK
Helmut Baltruschat, University of Bonn, Germany
Symeon Bebelis, University of Patras, Greece Annamaria Miko, Koç University, Turkey
James Rohan, Tyndall National Institute, Ireland Kristina Tschulik, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany

Back to top


Symposium 19
Electrochemical surface and interface

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Developing a complete atomistic picture on the com- plex interrelation between charge transfer, chemical conversion and interfacial potential in the presence of an electrolyte is one of the most imminent challenges in electrochemistry. At the same time, understanding the electrochemical interface at the atomic and molecular level is crucial for the design of new materials and optimization of electrochemical processes. This symposium will provide an interdisciplinary forum to discuss recent developments in experimental and theoretical electrochemistry that aim at a fundamental understanding of interface phenomena relevant for energy conversion and storage, chemical electrosynthesis and material preparation. It will provide a platform, for both electrochemistry and surface science community, to present and debate different key fundamental areas of electrochemical surface science. Main topics will be: structure-reactivity and structure-selectivity relationships, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, adsorption processes, new methods for imaging the electrochemical interface and reactive species, theoretical models and calculations, solvents and electrolyte effects, synthesis and characterization of new materials from thin- lms to nanostructures.

Symposium Organizers
Paramaconi Rodriguez, (Coordinator), University of Birmingham, UK (p.b.rodriguez@bham.ac.uk)
Enrique Herrero, University of Alicante, Spain
Katrin Domke, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Germany
Julia Kunze-Liebhäuser, University of Innsbruck, Austria
Natasa Vasiljević, University of Bristol, UK
Daria Vladikova, Institute of Electrochemistry and Energy Systems – BAS, Bulgaria

Back to top


Symposium 20
Cutting Edge Electrochemical Measurement Techniques

Sponsored by:
New topics division
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Precision measurements and advanced characterization techniques are critically important in understanding electrochemical processes at the interfaces or within the bulk of materials. Cutting edge measurement and characterization tools are being developed and incorporated in electrochemical researches. This symposium aims at providing a merging discussion forum for advanced measurement techniques and various scientific problems across sub elds of electrochemistry. The goal of the symposium is to promote cross-disciplinary exchange of ideas to inspire and fuel future electrochemical research with advanced measurement and characterization tools. The scope of the symposium includes the following advanced in situ or in-operando characterization techniques applied for studying electrochemical systems and processes related to health, energy, environment, etc.:
• Novel electrochemical techniques
• Scanning probe microscopies
• Electron microscopies
• Lab-based spectroscopies
• Synchrotron-based techniques
• Neutron-based techniques
• Free electron laser-based techniques
• Other advanced techniques for precision measurements

Symposium Organizers
Liwei Chen, (Coordinator), Shanghai Jiaotong University, China (lwchen2018@sjtu.edu.cn)
Bin Ren, Xiamen University, China
Olaf Magnussen, Kiel University, Germany
Alexandre Bastos, University of Aveiro, Portugal
Jose Solla-Gullon, University. of Alicante, Spain

Back to top


Symposium 21
Education and transmission of knowledge from the past to the new generations of electrochemists

Sponsored by: All Divisions

After successful symposia on education during previ- ous ISE annual meetings held recently in Mexico (2013) and the USA (2017), the objective of this Symposium is a transmission of knowledge from prominent electrochem- ists (chosen as key note and/or invited lecturers), having large experimental and theoretical background, to new generations of electrochemists.
Following O’Mara Bockris’s sentence: “Looking back to look forward”, particular ambition of this symposium is to obtain a better perspective on future efforts in electro- chemical education, research and applications.

The symposium topics cover, but are not limited to:
• “Lookingbacktolookforward”Transferofknowledge from prominent electrochemists to the coming generations of electrochemists.
• Teaching Electrochemistry in the frame of General Chemistry course - what to offer?
• Teaching Electrochemistry in the frame of physical chemistry course - what to offer?
• Creation of electrochemistry courses for different lev- els of studying - what students know when they enter and what they need to know to complete the course.
• From general to highly specialized courses in electrochemistry
• New teaching tools in electrochemistry education.
• Conceptsandstrategiesinelectrochemicaleducation.
• Experience in teaching and examination - Effect of adopted knowledge.
• The importance of experiments in teaching electrochemistry.
• Combining teaching transport phenomena, chemical catalysis (homogenous and heterogenous) and chemical reactors design with electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering.
• Electrochemicaleducationofengineersandscientists- what is the difference?
• Combining Electrochemistry and Computational Chemistry
• Modeling Electrochemical Reactions Using Density Functional Calculations

Symposium Organizers
Christos Comninellis, (Coordinator), EPFL, Switzerland (christos.comninellis@epfl.ch)
Hasuck Kim, Seoul National University, Korea
Velizar Stanković, University of Belgrade, Serbia
Aleksandar Zeradjanin, University of Bremen, Germany
Laszlo Peter, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary

Back to top


Symposium 22
General Session

Sponsored by: All Divisions

This Symposium will cover all ISE areas not compatible with topical symposia.

Symposium Organizers
Jun Chen (Coordinator), Nankai University, China (chenabc@nankai.edu.cn)
Woonsup Shin, Sogang University, South Korea
Jelena Lović, University of Belgrade, Serbia
Vladislava Jovanović, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Back to top